Romney: Don't want to help no poor people 'round here

This Republican GOP primary season seems to be rife with pratfalls, as if pranksters are littering the campaign trail with banana peels.

Actually, those pranksters are the candidates themselves. Remember Rick Perry? Remember Herman Cain? Remember Newt Gingrich (oh, that’s right, he’s still in)?

God, you gotta love these guys.

Mitt Romney, as expected, went through Florida last night like Caesar went through Gaul.

Then this morning Romney’s own tongue got twisted. Around his brain.

In an interview with CNN’s Soledad O’Brien, whose first name has never matched her last but I digress, Romney was talking about how his campaign would be focused on the economic frustrations of the middle class. It didn’t quite come out that way.

You see, he threw the poor under the bus in the process. Never mind that the bus finally gave some of them a roof over their heads.
Sayeth the poster child of the filthy rich 1 percent: “I’m in this race because I care about Americans. I’m not concerned about the very poor. We have a safety net there. If it needs repair, I’ll fix it. I’m not concerned about the very rich; they’re doing just fine. I’m concerned about the very heart of America, the 90 percent, 95 percent of Americans who right now are struggling.”
When O’Brien gave him a chance to dig his way out of a hole that was now about halfway to China, Romney dropped the shovel because he tripped over his aforementioned tongue yet again:
“We will hear from the Democrat party [about] the plight of the poor … and there’s no question it’s not good being poor, and we have a safety net to help those that are very poor. My focus is on middle-income Americans.”
Since Barack Obama also plans to court the middle class, suddenly what’s left of the middle class is in vogue. That economic class has suffered more shrinkage than a Chippendale in a cold swimming pool.
But too late for me, I’m now poorer than landfill dirt and wondering where the hell that safety net that Romney referenced is.

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