Obama hitches up Big Brother to plow under our civil liberties

If Barack Obama and Big Brother were any more intimate, they would be Liberace and Scott Thorson.

I know we can’t allow terrorists to blindside us like the cable companies do, but do we have to shred our personal liberties with a thresher of paranoia?

The president basically has been an underachiever, so why does he have to be so damn energetic about snooping on us?

Thank God Obama wasn’t president when I had all those magazines stashed under my bed as a teen.

What’s up with Obama? Has he been listening to so many Wagner operas that he’s starting to get the urge to conquer Poland when he’s done digging up all our dirt, including that squished under our fingernails?

Obama, of course, is giving the old soft shoe to all the Big Brother fears screaming like an alarm clock on crank.

Today the president vigorously defended the government’s newly disclosed collection of massive amounts of information from phone and internet records as a necessary defense against terrorism and assured Americans, “Nobody is listening to your telephone calls.”

Yeah, right. Are you swallowing that crock of spit?

“We have to make choices as a society,” Obama said in his first remarks about revelations of the huge scope of government surveillance. “It’s important to recognize that you can’t have 100 percent security and also then have 100 percent privacy and zero inconvenience.”

And when the hell did we have 100 percent security? Are you listening, Boston?

It was revealed late Wednesday that the National Security Agency has been collecting the phone records of hundreds of millions of U.S. phone customers.

The leaked document first reported by the Guardian newspaper gave the NSA authority to collect from all of Verizon’s land and mobile customers, but intelligence experts said the program swept up the records of other phone companies, too.

Another secret program revealed Thursday scours the internet usage of foreign nationals overseas who use any of nine U.S.-based internet providers such as Microsoft and Google.

What’s next? Policing our sock drawers?

If all this wasn’t enough, Obama also reportedly has ordered his senior national security and intelligence officials to draw up a list of potential overseas targets for U.S. cyber attacks.

The 18-page Presidential Policy Directive 20, issued in October last year but never published, states that what it calls Offensive Cyber Effects Operations (OCEO) “can offer unique and unconventional capabilities to advance US national objectives around the world with little or no warning to the adversary or target and with potential effects ranging from subtle to severely damaging.”

The directive also contemplates the possible use of cyber actions inside the U.S., though it specifies that no such domestic operations can be conducted without the prior order of the president, except in cases of emergency.

With our personal liberties going up in smoke, my parting words on the subject are: “Don’t Bogart that joint, Big Brother!”

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4 thoughts on “Obama hitches up Big Brother to plow under our civil liberties

  1. Murray says:

    They can’t be listening in on everybody and everything. Otherwise they would have easily nipped the Boston marathon bombing in the bud. Right?

  2. Correct.

    It’s impractical to listen in on everybody and everything.

    But one never knows just who they are listening in on.

    Zeke

  3. Murray says:

    I heard the guy they assigned to snoop on what you and I say to each other on this blog has a hard time staying awake.

  4. The guy must drink gallons of coffee 🙂

    Zeke

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